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hywel

By Hywel

Carmarthenshire, Wales Wal

A question about wallflowers ... I planted a few in the ground last spring and they have now become nice bushy plants. They will probably flower next spring.
However they are in the wrong place and I want to move them. Could I do it now or should I wait until the spring.




Answers

 

Best move them this autumn, but carefully so as not to disrupt the root balls. If your weather is very cool and damp you can do it now, otherwise wait till its cooler and damper, but still water them in well once moved.

7 Sep, 2019

 

To piggyback on Hywel's post, would this be a good time to feed last year's healthy looking wallflowers ?

7 Sep, 2019

 

Not really Pennyfarthing - the growing season is over, and any growth you encourage to grow by feeding now may not have time to harden off before frosts arrive.

7 Sep, 2019

 

Thanks Bamboo. I'll wait until later on :)

7 Sep, 2019

 

I had a gorgeous orange wallflower plant, but it only lasted 3 years, then it was gone. But for those 3 years I had the best smelling garden on the block. It bloomed for weeks and I could already smell it when I opened the kitchen window in the morning. The fragrance they emit is intoxicating and delightful. Are they short-lived plants or did something happen to mine (winter?).

8 Sep, 2019

 

They are usually biennial but maybe yours lasted for three years instead of two.
There are some perennial species to be had also but I think they have mauve flowers. There's one called 'Bowles Mauve' that I know of but I've never grown it.

8 Sep, 2019

 

perennial wallflowers do exist but are considered short lived [5 yrs then they get very leggy and woody lower down] but they take from cuttings very easily. There are varieties of yellow/orange/red and a combination of all 3 colours now as well as Bowles mauve. Erysium is the genus. google and have a look at the colour range available.

8 Sep, 2019

 

In the Victorians language of flowers Wallflowers means faithfulness and I love them, but I only expect them to flower for one season.
I also grow perennial wallflowers and they are Erysimum 'Bowles's Mauve' (my fav) Apricot Delight, Winter orchid and Golden jubilee are some of them, they all flower well but after about three seasons they become very woody and ungainly no matter what I do.

8 Sep, 2019

 

Agree with the above comments,Hywel..The Perennial Wallflowers are well worth having,and are really easy to take cuttings from..My original 'Bowles Mauve' has given me many cuttings over the years,it's .my favourite too,and some other nice colours are also available x

8 Sep, 2019

 

Thank you all, maybe I will try to get a perennial one :)

9 Sep, 2019

 

Wallflowers are worth growing just for the scent alone.They don't transplant well at all, so wherever you plant it, that's it.

9 Sep, 2019

 

Thank you Bathgate. They are totally in the wrong place, dotted around here and there, looking a bit daft, and they are also in the way of other things I want to plant so will have to be moved. If they die they die. I can always sow some more seeds :)

9 Sep, 2019

 

they should be fine to move Hywel, after all you can still buy bedding wallflowers bare root wrapped in newspaper here. If worried lift them with as much soil as you can spare around them.

9 Sep, 2019

 

I've moved mine ,with no adverse effect at all,Hywel..Ideal time if your soil is damp,and still quite warm,as ours is at the moment..
.

9 Sep, 2019

 

LOL I guess my experience is different. Seaburngirl made a good point to keep the rootball intact and undisturbed while transplanting - exactly what I didn't do. Also, I just found out that orange & yellow have the strongest scent.

9 Sep, 2019

How do I say thanks?

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