The Garden Community for Garden Lovers

Plumeria obtusa 'Singapore' - Singapore Plumeria


Plumeria obtusa 'Singapore'  - Singapore Plumeria (Plumeria obtusa 'Singapore'  - Singapore Plumeria)

My Singapore Plumeria is still blooming and producing buds. It's also developing new small flowers spikes, which is very early in the year for them to be produced. The Plumeria on the left is Plumeria rubra 'Tricolor' or 'Rainbow' which is dormant now. Photo taken Feb. 17, 2011.



Comments on this photo

 

Still rubbing it in Delonix....:o)))
I know what comes next, New small flower spikes from the really nice hot weather you've been having. ;o}

18 Feb, 2011

 

Alexandramou:

LOL! :>)

It's very unusual for my Singapore Plumeria to develop flower spikes so early...even though the weather has been warmer than normal. The Singapore Plumeria is an extremely tender tree...which needs warm nights and longer days to produce flowers spikes. Maybe it knows something I don't. lol! :>)

18 Feb, 2011

 

I've made up my mind Delonix, I am going to try and grow a Plumeria from seed. When and if I find a plant then I will buy one. ;o) (I already have the seeds in my basket)

18 Feb, 2011

 

Alexandramou:

I would highly recommend against growing Plumeria from seed. Many times it can take a long time to bloom and you never know what color you'll end up with.

It's best to get cutting-grown plants, if possible. The bigger the cutting the better...as they root easier.

According to what you've said in the past...Plumeria trees are not landscape shrubs/trees there, like here. However, I'm sure they must be available. I do know large Plumeria trees grow on Cyprus. I'm not sure how far Cyprus is from Corfu, though.

18 Feb, 2011

 

Oooh Dont say that Andy Im still trying..in fact I have just aquired anothe couple of seeds.....My 1st sowing in 5 years old this year and I am hoping I may get a bloom on one of your cuttings.....Lol

18 Feb, 2011

 

Milky:

You know first hand how long it takes for a seed-grown Plumeria to bloom. The rule of thumb is 3 - 5 years to the first flower spike. Although, many times seeds grown directly in the ground will bloom in 2 years. (which unfortunately, you can't do) :>(

I think the best way for you to get your Plumerias to bloom...will be to put them out in direct sun for at least 6 hours a day, in summer (a south to south-west facing location would be best).

19 Feb, 2011

 

Delonix,

I ordered my seeds ;o\ and not just one type but three...consider this my experiment for the next 3-5 years.

Cyprus is probably as far as NY to CA...

When and if I come across a plant I will buy one....I've been reading they smell gorgeous.

19 Feb, 2011

 

Alexandramou:

Good luck and have fun growing the Plumerias from seed. :>) Most likely you'll get them to bloom in 2 to 3 years from seed, in Corfu. You have very hot summers with very bright sunshine. An important thing about Plumerias is...they love extreme heat and bright sunshine (even at a young age).

I'm pretty good with geography...however, I didn't realized Corfu was that far from Cyprus...it's extremely far! lol!

20 Feb, 2011

 

Weeeeel Delonix, it's probably not that far. You need a plane ride to Athens then a plane ride to Cyprus...or a boat ride to the main land, then by car to Athens then another plane ride to Cyprus....
From what I read it's about 1303.29 Kilometers from Corfu.
Wish I would have known about the large Plumeria there...my parents just came back from their holiday to Cyprus. Oh well.

20 Feb, 2011

 

Alexandramou:

It's definitely not as far as San Diego to New York, which is 3,914 km (2,432 miles). :>)

Yes, it would've been nice to get some large cuttings from Cyprus. Cuttings can be left out for months (or even for more than a year) before planting.

20 Feb, 2011

 

Delonix,
That was the geography lesson for yesterday.
Too late now for the cuttings....oh well.

21 Feb, 2011

 

Alexandramou:

I bet you'll find some Plumerias where you live. A nursery should have some in your climate. :>)

23 Feb, 2011

 

I'm going on a hunt then...

Then again, we were having this conversation with Bik...he lives in Xanthe Greece. Nurseries here seem to supply the same old plants all the time.

23 Feb, 2011

 

Alexandramou:

I read on Palmtalk that many people in Greece have complained about the limited species of plants in their nurseries.

We're so lucky (and spoiled) here in CA. We have such a huge selection of plants...and we also have many specialty nurseries. There's many palms and tropical plants nurseries -- with plants available from all around the world. Also, we have major hybridizing programs for many plants here.

23 Feb, 2011

 

Now what do I say to all of that :o\.....

23 Feb, 2011

 

Alexandramou:

Well, it has a lot to do with money. Even though we're still in a horrible, horrible recession here in CA (and it doesn't seem to be getting better). CA has always had a tremendous amount of wealth. If California was a country, it would be the 7th largest economy in the world.

23 Feb, 2011

 

...and Greece would be at the bottom!

23 Feb, 2011

 

Alexandramou:

No, that's definitely not true. It's just so many countries are going through a deep recession.

Being an accountant I predicted this deep recession many years ago (so many trends were leading to it)...I just didn't realize it was going to last so darned long!

23 Feb, 2011

 

Oh Delonix, let me complain a little...

Can you predict a change for the better and soon please. ;o)

We were making plans to visit NY this winter but with the economy being so bad... Oh well, at least we own our house and business...that's a lot more than a lot of people have. So I'm thankful and smiling.

23 Feb, 2011

 

Alexandramou:

Complain away. lol! :>)

I think it's very, very slowly getting better here in the U.S., however, we still have a long way to go, unfortunately.

Yes, you should definitely feel fortunate...there's so many people out in the world living in such poverty.
:>(
We should definitely appreciate what we have. I count my blessings more so than ever, now. As, it all can be taken away in a blink of an eye.

23 Feb, 2011

 

A very beautiful plant, but I will not be growing this one.......

2 Mar, 2011

 

Dottydaisy2:

Thanks! Singapore Plumeria is definitely more tropical...it may not be available where you live. The Plumeria rubra is hardier, even though still tropical, it does go deciduous in winter.

3 Mar, 2011

 

Plumeria obtusa is really one of the most tropical looking plants you can keep. I'm pleasantly surprised at the growth I've gotten out of a cutting this summer.
Now,how long till flowering? Next year or?

24 Sep, 2014

 

Cuttings bloom very quickly and easily.

24 Sep, 2014

 

Thanks!

26 Sep, 2014

 

You're welcome.

There's a large P. obtusa 'Singapore' not to far from where I live. One year (about 7 years ago) they cut it back so much and I wish I was there to collect the branches. It has since recovered.

Here's the photo.

http://www.growsonyou.com/photo/slideshow/222849-plumeria-obtusa-singapore-singapore-plumeria

26 Sep, 2014



Comment on this photo


Pictures by all members
142200 of 301380

What else?

View photos by Delonix1

See who else is growing Plumeria obtusa 'Singapore' - Singapore Plumeria.

See who else has plants in genus Plumeria.

Members who like this photo

  • Gardening with friends since
    9 Jul, 2010

  • Gardening with friends since
    20 Mar, 2009

  • Gardening with friends since
    27 Feb, 2009

  • Gardening with friends since
    5 May, 2010

  • uma
    Uma

    Gardening with friends since
    28 Oct, 2009

  • Gardening with friends since
    27 Sep, 2008